• Wednesday 19 June 2019

    • 14:00

      Golf

      Optional round of golf on the 18-hole championship course at The Grove.

    • 14:00

      Cycle

      Optional 65km road ride taking in the sights of the Hertfordshire countryside.

    • 14:00

      Tennis

      Optional tennis competition on the courts in the walled garden at The Grove.

    • 15:00

      Arrival and bag drop

    • 19:00

      Barbecue

      Welcome remarks from event chairperson, golf and tennis prize giving.


  • Thursday 20 June 2019

    • 07:30

      Morning exercise

      Choice of group trail bike (6.5km), run (6.5km), yoga (45mins) or spin class (45mins)

    • 09:30

      Keynote: Asset Allocation Outlook

      CIO interview on private markets as part of a diversified portfolio.

    • 10:00

      Keynote: Geopolitics

      Leading thinker explains how geopolitical forces are shaping decisions in the corridors of power across Europe.

    • 10:20

      Keynote panel: Europe in a Global Private Equity context

      An investor panel featuring global institutions discuss the positioning of European opportunities as part of a global programme.

    • 10:40

      Panel: An outlook on long-term capital

      Appetite from LPs appears to be growing for longer-dated funds. GPs point to the merits of patient capital; it offers exposure to a different profile of company which, with a longer exit horizon, can benefit from a greater focus on sustainable growth. It isn’t without risks. The pace of technological and geopolitical change makes forecasting a decade into the future more difficult than ever; notwithstanding the likelihood GPs having to stick with a business into the next economic downturn. Many of the long-term funds being marketed by GPs have had lower return targets than flagship buyout funds, questioning if this really offers diversification versus other asset classes. In this session, we explore the future of long-term capital in private equity, asking if this is an evolution of the asset class or just a product of fundraising in late-economic cycle.

      Merrick  McKay
      Merrick McKay
      Head of Europe – Private Equity, Aberdeen Standard Investments
    • 11:20

      Pause

    • 11:50

      Panel: Advanced secondaries

      When a fund approaches the end of its lifespan before the optimal exit window emerges for its remaining asset, transferring the portfolio company into a new vehicle is proving increasingly popular. Until recently, almost all solvent divestments of portfolio companies saw GPs selling to a trade buyer, another private equity sponsor, or, less frequently, via the public markets. However, recent years have seen the growing popularity of single asset fund restructurings, where a GP can maintain ownership of the company with the support of secondary capital. In this session we explore the outlook for GP-led fund restructurings, the evolution of deploying secondaries capital in this way and LP appetite. We also consider the rise of secondaries as an asset class within PE, as investors seek liquidity solutions for fund holdings at a time when portfolio companies are under longer ownership.

    • 12:30

      Keynote: Digital

      Global investor viewpoints on how technology is transforming business models, markets and the private equity industry.

    • 13:00

      Lunch

    • 14:00

      Portfolio companies dealing with disruption

      As the corporate world strike more deals with technology companies, it seems the next big thing is all things digital. Typically renowned for being early-movers or transforming out-of-favour companies we ask whether this industrial revolution changes anything for private equity managers.

      Through a series of views from portfolio company CEOs, we hear first-hand about the next 5 years in their respective sectors. We ask who drives the adoption of new technologies - private equity owners or management teams – and what skills GPs need to support portfolio companies in this era of digital disruption.

    • 14:40

      Panel: Generalist versus specialist funds

      Industry specialisation attracting expert operating partners and senior advisors. Are these funds better placed to understand industry disruption and develop business strategies to adapt. What are the risks for generalist funds falling behind the curve and what is their advantage against specialist managers?

    • 15:20

      Keynote: Demographics

      995 million people will be aged over 65 by 2030 with older people prioritising experience over ‘stuff’, but younger generations also showing a strong predilection for experiences. Migration and mobility will facilitate this trend. Aging consumers, delayed marriage and smaller families are predicted to drive demand for premium products. Rising urbanisation and population growth will give rise to more connected consumers on the back of an expanding youth population and better connectivity.

    • 15:40

      Pause

    • 16:00

      Keynote: Food supply

      The world will need to feed an extra two billion people by 2050. Such population growth in combination with climate change will have a dramatic effect on agricultural productivity and global food supply.  Meat demand increases as the middle class grows in developing markets. We’ll need to do more with less. Can the world technologise its way out of the problem?

    • 16:20

      Panel: Food consumption

      Europe’s population faces an impending health crisis. Growing levels of obesity and diabetes has awakened policymakers, manufacturers and consumers to the urgent need to change our eating habits. Meanwhile, a younger generation of health-conscious consumers, with diets that feature less sugar and more grains, is creating new markets. The demand for better traceability of food products has prompted restauranteurs and retailers to return to nostalgic values of sourcing local produce.

    • 17:00

      Conference Close

    • 19:30

      Drinks Reception

    • 20:00

      Dinner

      After-dinner speech: Millennial Consumers

  • Friday 21 June 2019

    • 07:30

      Morning exercise

      Choice of group trail bike (6.5km), run (6.5km), yoga (45mins) or spin class (45mins)

    • 09:45

      Keynote: Climate change

      Addressing the urgent rhetoric around climate action, protecting ecological diversity and decarbonisation. Should industry take the lead?

    • 10:10

      Developing a customised approach to ESG

      In this discussion we explore whether the key to successful ESG is in the eye of the beholder and how differing priorities can be effectively managed. Yet LP priorities are driven largely by their institutional outlook and geographical base. For example, European-based investors may prioritise environmental concerns over their North American equivalents; something that could be driven by different levels of regulation and domestic government policy

    • 10:50

      Pause

    • 11:20

      Panel: The journey to “impact”, the end-game for ESG

      Processes that examine ESG factors are now well and truly embedded into the fund selection process for LPs and investment process for GPs. For GPs, however, ESG varies from those selecting investments on the basis of such factors (typically referred to as impact investing), whilst others adopt a risk-screening approach by regularly monitoring data points from portfolio companies. To have real impact, the next phase for ESG is to embed practices more closely to value creation. In this discussion we explore how GPs are reorganising their deal teams to ensure there are closer ties to financial returns and impact.

    • 12:00

      Lunch & check-out

  • Wednesday 19 June 2019

    • 14:00

      Golf

      Optional round of golf on the 18-hole championship course at The Grove.

    • 14:00

      Cycle

      Optional 65km road ride taking in the sights of the Hertfordshire countryside.

    • 14:00

      Tennis

      Optional tennis competition on the courts in the walled garden at The Grove.

    • 15:00

      Arrival and bag drop

    • 19:00

      Barbecue

      Welcome remarks from event chairperson, golf and tennis prize giving.


  • Thursday 20 June 2019

    • 07:30

      Morning exercise

      Choice of group trail bike (6.5km), run (6.5km), yoga (45mins) or spin class (45mins)

    • 09:30

      Keynote: Asset Allocation Outlook

      CIO interview on private markets as part of a diversified portfolio.

    • 10:00

      Keynote: Geopolitics

      Leading thinker explains how geopolitical forces are shaping decisions in the corridors of power across Europe.

    • 10:20

      Keynote panel: Europe in a Global Private Equity context

      An investor panel featuring global institutions discuss the positioning of European opportunities as part of a global programme.

    • 10:40

      Panel: An outlook on long-term capital

      Appetite from LPs appears to be growing for longer-dated funds. GPs point to the merits of patient capital; it offers exposure to a different profile of company which, with a longer exit horizon, can benefit from a greater focus on sustainable growth. It isn’t without risks. The pace of technological and geopolitical change makes forecasting a decade into the future more difficult than ever; notwithstanding the likelihood GPs having to stick with a business into the next economic downturn. Many of the long-term funds being marketed by GPs have had lower return targets than flagship buyout funds, questioning if this really offers diversification versus other asset classes. In this session, we explore the future of long-term capital in private equity, asking if this is an evolution of the asset class or just a product of fundraising in late-economic cycle.

      Merrick  McKay
      Merrick McKay
      Head of Europe – Private Equity, Aberdeen Standard Investments
    • 11:20

      Pause

    • 11:50

      Panel: Advanced secondaries

      When a fund approaches the end of its lifespan before the optimal exit window emerges for its remaining asset, transferring the portfolio company into a new vehicle is proving increasingly popular. Until recently, almost all solvent divestments of portfolio companies saw GPs selling to a trade buyer, another private equity sponsor, or, less frequently, via the public markets. However, recent years have seen the growing popularity of single asset fund restructurings, where a GP can maintain ownership of the company with the support of secondary capital. In this session we explore the outlook for GP-led fund restructurings, the evolution of deploying secondaries capital in this way and LP appetite. We also consider the rise of secondaries as an asset class within PE, as investors seek liquidity solutions for fund holdings at a time when portfolio companies are under longer ownership.

    • 12:30

      Keynote: Digital

      Global investor viewpoints on how technology is transforming business models, markets and the private equity industry.

    • 13:00

      Lunch

    • 14:00

      Portfolio companies dealing with disruption

      As the corporate world strike more deals with technology companies, it seems the next big thing is all things digital. Typically renowned for being early-movers or transforming out-of-favour companies we ask whether this industrial revolution changes anything for private equity managers.

      Through a series of views from portfolio company CEOs, we hear first-hand about the next 5 years in their respective sectors. We ask who drives the adoption of new technologies - private equity owners or management teams – and what skills GPs need to support portfolio companies in this era of digital disruption.

    • 14:40

      Panel: Generalist versus specialist funds

      Industry specialisation attracting expert operating partners and senior advisors. Are these funds better placed to understand industry disruption and develop business strategies to adapt. What are the risks for generalist funds falling behind the curve and what is their advantage against specialist managers?

    • 15:20

      Keynote: Demographics

      995 million people will be aged over 65 by 2030 with older people prioritising experience over ‘stuff’, but younger generations also showing a strong predilection for experiences. Migration and mobility will facilitate this trend. Aging consumers, delayed marriage and smaller families are predicted to drive demand for premium products. Rising urbanisation and population growth will give rise to more connected consumers on the back of an expanding youth population and better connectivity.

    • 15:40

      Pause

    • 16:00

      Keynote: Food supply

      The world will need to feed an extra two billion people by 2050. Such population growth in combination with climate change will have a dramatic effect on agricultural productivity and global food supply.  Meat demand increases as the middle class grows in developing markets. We’ll need to do more with less. Can the world technologise its way out of the problem?

    • 16:20

      Panel: Food consumption

      Europe’s population faces an impending health crisis. Growing levels of obesity and diabetes has awakened policymakers, manufacturers and consumers to the urgent need to change our eating habits. Meanwhile, a younger generation of health-conscious consumers, with diets that feature less sugar and more grains, is creating new markets. The demand for better traceability of food products has prompted restauranteurs and retailers to return to nostalgic values of sourcing local produce.

    • 17:00

      Conference Close

    • 19:30

      Drinks Reception

    • 20:00

      Dinner

      After-dinner speech: Millennial Consumers

  • Friday 21 June 2019

    • 07:30

      Morning exercise

      Choice of group trail bike (6.5km), run (6.5km), yoga (45mins) or spin class (45mins)

    • 09:45

      Keynote: Climate change

      Addressing the urgent rhetoric around climate action, protecting ecological diversity and decarbonisation. Should industry take the lead?

    • 10:10

      Developing a customised approach to ESG

      In this discussion we explore whether the key to successful ESG is in the eye of the beholder and how differing priorities can be effectively managed. Yet LP priorities are driven largely by their institutional outlook and geographical base. For example, European-based investors may prioritise environmental concerns over their North American equivalents; something that could be driven by different levels of regulation and domestic government policy

    • 10:50

      Pause

    • 11:20

      Panel: The journey to “impact”, the end-game for ESG

      Processes that examine ESG factors are now well and truly embedded into the fund selection process for LPs and investment process for GPs. For GPs, however, ESG varies from those selecting investments on the basis of such factors (typically referred to as impact investing), whilst others adopt a risk-screening approach by regularly monitoring data points from portfolio companies. To have real impact, the next phase for ESG is to embed practices more closely to value creation. In this discussion we explore how GPs are reorganising their deal teams to ensure there are closer ties to financial returns and impact.

    • 12:00

      Lunch & check-out

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